Sunday Reflections

 

Each Sunday and Solemn Feastday, we celebrate the mysteries of our faith in a special way. We have resources here to enrich your celebration of God’s word this sunday.

Please join Rev. Fr. (Dr.) Gerald Umoren as he reflects on the readings.

 
1St Reading: Prov 31: 10=13, 19-20, 30-31; 2nd Reading: 1Thes 5: 1-6; Gospel: Mtt. 25: 14-30

FOCUS OF THE READINGS

One prominent message that can be drawn from the readings is the need to be responsible for ones ‘talents.’ Everybody has some responsibility in life. There is the concern over how well we have carried out these responsibilities especially those which have to do with our religious standing. The 1st reading commends the responsibility of a ‘capable’ woman but over and above her physical goodness, her fear of the Lord is extolled. Paul encourages the Thessalonians in the 2nd reading to behave like children of light lest they be taken unawares by the coming of the Lord. There is also an aspect of the call for responsibility here. The message here is that we should be awake to our responsibilities. The Gospel reading is the parable of the talents. The first two servants who showed responsibility were commended but the third servant who was idle and lazy got rebuked and was called ‘good for nothing.’ Given this background, you may want to build your reflection around the need to avoid wasting one’s ‘talents.’ The following themes can also be developed:

  • The fear of the Lord is prized above every other virtue
  • That we be children of light
  • End-time watch: Be alert and sober
  • Believers in Christ are in the light
  • We are children of light
  • The way we live now prepares us for the Lord’s return
  • Taking responsibility for one’s talents
  • Looking forward to sharing the ‘Master’s Joy.’
 
SAMPLE HOMILY
THEME: ‘Good-for-nothing’...?
Dear friends,
Today we are presented with series of commendations and rebukes in the readings. The 1st reading praises a woman who is not only responsible in her home but also exhibits the fear of God in her actions. The 2nd reading commends and recommends the Thessalonians as ‘children of light.’ Above all, from the parable of the talents in the Gospel reading, the first two servants are greatly extolled: “well-done good and trustworthy servant...” but the third was badly rebuked: “you wicked and lazy servant...” The commendations were good, consoling and rewarding: “come and share in the Master’s joy.” But the rebukes were very damaging and destructive: “Throw him into the darkness outside.” While the whole idea of being condemned should scare somebody, what really touches me here and what I would want to share with you is the damaging import of the description which the Master made of this third servant. He was called “good-for-nothing.”
It is important to think about this sad situation. He was not only called wicked and lazy, he was called ‘good-for-nothing.’ Can we learn from this? Yes, we should truly learn from this. Every one of us is expected to be good for something but sometimes out of laziness or even wickedness we are not productive and could be like this good-for-nothing servant. Today there is the need to examine ourselves personally and be sure that we are not good-for-nothing in output. There is always some area of strength in one’s life no matter what weakness the person has. The wise thing is to maximize one’s strong points and use them to cushion the effects of one’s weakness. But when we exhibit a ‘good-for-nothing’ attitude, if we are lazy or wicked (cf. Gospel reading), then we would even lose our strong points and relapse into non-productivity. We have to be careful lest we qualify to be addressed as ‘good-for-nothing’ like this lazy servant in the Gospel reading. This recommendation serves both for our spiritual and temporal lives. Let us avoid wasting our talents. May we be active and productive. May we never be found to be ‘good-for-nothing.’

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